24 Utterly Disturbing Items Made Out Of Human Flesh By A Serial Killer!

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Creating himself lots of disgustingly terrifying, stomach-churning furniture and ready-to-wear fashion, he took the freedom of fashion about a marathon of steps too far. 

Ed Gein was a notorious killer and grave robber. He inspired the creation of several film characters, including Norman Bates ('Psycho'), Jame Gumb ('The Silence of the Lambs') and Leatherface ('Texas Chainsaw Massacre'). From bowls and cutlery all the way to gloves, Ed made just about everything from the skin of his victims and the bodies he exhumed from local graveyards.

Not only are the following images NSFW and totally mind-blowingly gross, they will also make you want to ask one very important question: How bad must his house have smelled?! I mean jeez, he had belts made of nipples for goodness sake!

1. Edward Theodore Gein was born on August 27, 1906 in La Crosse, Wisconsin.

2. The son of a timid alcoholic father and a fanatically religious mother, Gein grew up alongside his older brother, Henry, in a household ruled by his mother's puritanical preachings about the sins of lust and carnal desire.

3. Obsessively devoted to his mother until her death in 1945, Gein never left home or dated women.

Shortly after his mother's death, Gein had decided he wanted a sex change and began to create a "woman suit" so he could pretend to be a female. Gein's practice of donning the tanned skins of women was described as an "insane transvestite ritual."

4. After she died, he became increasingly deranged and eventually began prowling cemeteries to unearth recently buried female corpses.

He dug up the graves of recently buried middle-aged women he thought resembled his mother and took the bodies home, where he tanned their skins to make his paraphernalia. Gein admitted robbing nine graves, leading investigators to their locations. Because authorities were uncertain as to whether the slight Gein was capable of single-handedly digging up a grave in a single evening, they exhumed two of the graves and found them empty, thus corroborating Gein's confession.

5. He would cut off body parts and keep them as trophies, returning the corpses seemingly undisturbed to their graves.

A 16-year-old youth whose parents were friends of Gein, and who attended ball games and movies with Gein, reported that he was aware of the shrunken heads, which Gein had described as relics from the Philippines sent by a cousin who had served in World War II. Upon investigation by the police, these were determined to be human facial skins, carefully peeled from cadavers and used as masks by Gein.

6. In 1954, Ed Gein turned from grave robbing to murder, a task he was less meticulous about.

On different occasions, he dug up the graves of recently buried middle-aged women he thought resembled his mother and took the bodies home, where he tanned their skins to make his paraphernalia. Gein admitted robbing nine graves, leading investigators to their locations. Because authorities were uncertain as to whether the slight Gein was capable of single-handedly digging up a grave in a single evening, they exhumed two of the graves and found them empty, thus corroborating Gein's confession.

7. On November 16, 1957, Plainfield hardware store owner Bernice Worden disappeared, and police had reason to suspect Gein.

Worden's son had told investigators that Gein had been in the store the evening before the disappearance, saying he would return the following morning for a gallon of anti-freeze. A sales slip for a gallon of anti-freeze was the last receipt written by Worden on the morning she disappeared.

8. During the investigations, police learned that he had practiced necrophilia and experimented with human taxidermy.

When questioned, Gein told investigators that between 1947 and 1952, he made as many as 40 nocturnal visits to three local graveyards to exhume recently buried bodies while he was in a "daze-like" state. On about 30 of those visits, he said he had come out of the daze while in the cemetery, left the grave in good order, and returned home empty handed.

9. Gein denied having sex with the bodies he exhumed, explaining, "They smelled too bad." During interrogation, Gein also admitted to the shooting death of Mary Hogan, a tavern operator missing since 1954.

Upon searching Gein's property, investigators discovered Worden's decapitated body in a shed, hung upside down by ropes at her wrists, with a crossbar at her ankles. The torso was "dressed out" like that of a deer. She had been shot with a .22-caliber rifle, and the mutilations performed after death. 

Searching the house, authorities found:

  • Four noses

  • Whole human bones and fragments

  • Nine masks of human skin

  • Bowls made from human skulls

  • Ten female heads with the tops sawed off

  • Human skin covering several chair seats

  • Mary Hogan's head in a paper bag

  • Bernice Worden's head in a burlap sack

  • Nine vulvas in a shoe box

  • Skulls on his bedposts

  • Organs in the refrigerator

  • A pair of lips on a draw string for a window shade

  • A belt made from human female nipples

  • A lampshade made from the skin of a human face

10. On March 20, 1958, while Gein was in detention, his house burned to the ground. Arson was suspected. When Gein learned of the incident, he shrugged and said, "Just as well."

11. That same year, Gein pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. He was found unfit to stand trial and committed to a mental hospital for criminals.

Waushara County sheriff, Art Schley, allegedly physically assaulted Gein during questioning by banging Gein's head and face into a brick wall, causing Gein's initial confession to be ruled inadmissible. Schley died of a heart attack in December 1968, at the age of 43, only a month after testifying at Gein's trial. Many who knew him said he was traumatized by the horror of Gein's crime and that this, along with the fear of having to testify (especially about assaulting Gein), led to his early death. One of his friends said, "He was a victim of Ed Gein as surely as if he had butchered him."

12. Nearly ten years later, in 1968, Gein's doctors determined he was sane enough to stand trial.

The trial began on November 14, 1968, lasting one week. He was found guilty of first-degree murder by Judge Robert H. Gollmar, but because he was found to be legally insane, he spent the rest of his life in a mental hospital.

13. He was confined to various criminal psychiatric institutions, including the Central State Hospital in Wisconsin and the Mendota Mental Health Institute, where he died of respiratory and heart failure due to cancer, on July 26, 1984, at the age of 77.

14. His grave site in the Plainfield cemetery was frequently vandalized over the years; souvenir seekers chipped off pieces of his gravestone before the bulk of it was stolen in 2000.

The gravestone was recovered in June 2001 near Seattle and is now in a museum in Waushara County.

15. The story of Ed Gein has had a lasting impact on popular culture as evidenced by its numerous appearances in movies, music, and literature.

Gein's story was adapted into a number of movies, including Deranged (1974), In the Light of the Moon (2000, later retitled Ed Gein for the U.S. market), and Ed Gein: The Butcher of Plainfield (2007). Gein influenced the nature of book and film characters, most notably such fictional serial killers as Norman Bates (Psycho), Leatherface (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre), and Buffalo Bill (The Silence of the Lambs).

16. In 1958, Gein's car, which he had used to haul the bodies of his victims, was sold at a public auction for $760 ($5,718 when accounting for inflation) to carnival sideshow operator Bunny Gibbons. Gibbons later charged carnival goers 25¢ admission to see it.

17. At the time, the news reports of Gein's crimes spawned a subgenre of black humor.

Since the 1950s, Gein has frequently been exploited in transgressive art or shock rock, often with no connection to his life or crimes beyond the shock value of his name.

18. A biographical musical titled "Ed Gein: the Musical" premiered on January 2, 2010 in Menasha, Wisconsin.

19. 

Here are a few more gruesome items Ed found to be the epitome of home decor and fashion chic:

Tongue Necklace

Click to see.
d3310hm27mievn.galaxant.com

Nipple Belt

Click to see.

Skin Gloves

Click to see.

Skull Candles

Click to see.

Wall Hanging

Click to see.

This decorative art really adds something to the whole 'house of horrors' theme.

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den-gath

No worse than using the skins and bones of other sentient beings.

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