This Powerful Photo Project Show Real Laughters And Tears!

Men-

It is not common to see photographs that show real human emotions. Women are usually represented as seductive while men seem masculine and with less emotion. Young and talented photographer Maud Fernhout took a bold step and decided to photograph the real emotions of women and men.

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1. Job, 18 years old. 'For me, crying is not showing your weakness. When I cry, I can accept my feelings and I'm able to continue. It makes me stronger'

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Maud Fernhout, the photographer of this project, is studying Social Sciences in Utrecht University. Fernhout started a project called What Real Women Laugh Like and What Real Men Cry Like

Fernhout claims: 'Photography for me is a way to express myself and my view of the world, and to help others do the same.'

2. Jip, 20 years old

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'Emotional crying is one of the few things that differentiate us from animals. Ironically, so is the urge to suppress our nature because of social constructs'

3. 'Because they are real and they are truly beautiful, and they have something to say.'

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Fernhout explains:

'What I want to show you are the thoughts and feelings of the dozens of guys and girls from my generation that have sat on my chair and shown me themselves.'

4. Seeing women and men like this is really a rare opportunity.

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'Is being a man really suppressing your emotions; acting as if you do not have them (for example by not crying), even when others are not around? Not if you ask me.'
Fernhout continues.

5. Andrea is 19 years old.

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'Proud to be happy. Proud to be human. Proud of my laughter. Proud to be a woman!'

6. 'Showing emotion and leveling with the people around you only shows strength and personality, not weakness'

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7. 'Because in the end it's not even about crying - that's just the visual representation in this case. It's about showing emotion and opening up.'

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8. Florian, 19, says: 'I personally don't see the point in crying. I understand it can be a relief. But I would rather tackle'

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9. 'I used to see myself as strong because I did not cry; now I feel weak because I cannot cry'

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Aditya, 19.

10. 'How water purifies the body, tears purify the soul'

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Milos, 20.

11. Liedeke, 19, has some solid advice!

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'Laugh as if no one is around and don't worry too much about what others think. Be happy and love yourself. I think that's when true beauty shows itself'

12. 'As the camera was pointed at my face I suddenly became aware of every single muscle one uses to truly laugh out loud'

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13. Emma, 20 years old.

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'I love to laugh the way I used to when I was a child. That belly-tickling, head-tilting, wide-mouthed laughter. That laughter that leaves you gasping for air and brushing warm tears off of your cheek. I think if any force can break the claustrophobic box of civility, it is the force of child-like laughter'

14. Both of these projects included 20 women and 20 men between ages 18-25

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These photos tell a lot about vulnerabilities of being a human in the modern world.

How do you feel?
Lovely
Scream
Tears of Joy
Relieved Face
Clapping Hands
Thumbs Down
Angry

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